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Monthly Archives: February 2012

Android falls flat in front of malware coming from Facebook

Google’s Android operating system has had its fair share of concerns as of late, with people growing concerned over flaws that have been unearthed at different times, and malware for the OS appearing on the Android Market. While the scale is still small enough to avoid, more crafty people are looking into ways to get their questionable apps on the OS so that they can cause havoc and potentially harvest details.

Google have tried to prevent this happening in the form of ‘Bouncer’, an automated scanner of the Android Market which picks up on malware and removes it. Bouncer came into use early in February, but it does not protect individual phones, nor does it prevent other sites from holding malware infested files. TechCrunch confirms that Sophos anti-virus have picked up on the flaw. The newest example is an application entitled “any_name.apk”; and it’s spreading via the Facebook for Android application.

When downloaded, the application installs without any permissions granted by the user, and the identity of what is being downloaded is also not made clear. This may not be the case assuming a phone maintains its default settings, since Android comes with a toggle against downloads from alternative sources. Many users do disable this though, so that they can download applications from locations such as the XDA Developers forum.

It seems that this APK is intended to call premium rate phone numbers or send them text messages, incurring large charges which can then be picked up by the fraudsters and con-men who operate the numbers, as well as likely having created the app. The app is also evolving quickly: the researcher who found it downloaded it from a different site a few days later, where it was called “allnew.apk”. The newer version worked in the same manner though was coded differently, which would imply that it is being constantly updated.

The malware associates itself with the Opera web browser for Android, including an encrypted configuration file with the dialling numbers for premium rate lines. Google have responded to the news, claiming that an install could not have happened in the manner depicted. According to Google a user would have to permit that the phone installed the application even if it was downloaded without their consent or knowledge. Sophos have not yet commented on this claim. Regardless, it may be worth unchecking the ability to download from other sources when not downloading an app, to help better maintain security.

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Posted by on February 27, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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Nokia officially announces the Lumia 610

Nokia has just officially announced the Lumia 610 at MWC 2012, which they are calling “their most affordable Lumia smartphone yet”. It is a fully-fledged but lower-priced Windows Phone that features all of Nokia’s exclusive Windows Phone applications such as Nokia Drive, Nokia Maps and a new app which they are calling “Nokia Transport”. This new application shows you directions to your nearest station along with timetable information.

 

As you might expect from a lower number in the Lumia range, the Lumia 610 really is a low-end device with a 3.7″ LCD display at 800 x 480, an 800 MHz single-core Qualcom MSM7X27A processor and just 256 MB of RAM. There is also a 5-megapixel camera on the back, 8 GB of internal storage, quad-band HSPA and a 1,300 mAh battery. The device will also be running an update to Windows Phone 7.5 called “Tango”, which helps to bring low-end devices such as this one to China and other emerging markets.

The Lumia 610 will be available in Q2 2012 for an estimated price of 189 euros (around US$250) before carrier subsidies. For more information check out Nokia’s new webpage for the Lumia 610.

Images courtesy of Nokia

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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Down for everyoen or just me

Want to know the site is really down or not.. !

check out following URL

http://www.downforeveryoneorjustme.com/

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2012 in Tips

 

Hide Drives in My Computer

This setting allows you to control which drives are visible in My Computer and Explorer. It is possible to hide all drives or just selected ones.

Open your registry and find or create the key below.

The “NoDrives” value uses a 32-bit word to define local and network drive visibility for each logical drive in the computer. The lower 26 bits of the 32-bit word correspond to drive letters A through Z. Drives are visible when set to 0 and hidden when set to 1.

If your not happy working in Hex, add these decimal numbers to hide the drive(s):

A: 1, B: 2, C: 4, D: 8, E: 16, F: 32, G: 64, H: 128, I: 256, J: 512, K: 1024, L: 2048, M: 4096, N: 8192, O: 16384, P: 32768, Q: 65536, R: 131072, S: 262144, T: 524288, U: 1048576, V: 2097152, W: 4194304, X: 8388608, Y: 16777216, Z: 33554432, ALL: 67108863

For example to hide drive A and drive D, you would add 1 (A) + 8 (D) which means the value should be set to “9”.

To disable all the drives set the value to “67108863”.

Restart Windows for the change to take effect.

Note: These drives will still appear in File Manager, to remove File Manager, delete or rename winfile.exe

Registry Settings

User Key: [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\
Explorer]
System Key: [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\
Explorer]
Value Name: NoDrives
Data Type: REG_DWORD (DWORD Value)
 
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Posted by on February 24, 2012 in Tips

 

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Your next Linux desktop could be an Android Phone

So how cool would it be getting the full Ubuntu OS running on your device? The answer is: very cool. Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu understands this and has decided to work on a full desktop version of Ubuntu which works with multi-core Android devices.

Imagine carrying a full desktop computer in your pocket. We’re not talking about tablet OS’s we’re talking about a better standard system which meets the needs and requirements of all users.

Ubuntu for Android is something that is already available unofficially but lacks functionality and is something we’ve only dreamed about up to this point.

It makes sense that Canonical would start developing this seeing as the Android kernel is based on the Linux kernel which is fully compatible with Ubuntu. This means that the core system should work. On top of the standard Ubuntu OS, users will be able to access all of their phone’s goodies, including SMS messages and phone calls.

Linux-based systems aren’t hardware demanding. In fact, most multi-core phones with at least 512MB of RAM should be able to handle the Ubuntu build for Android.

This does not rid users of Android, nor does it ruin the way either operating system works. Ubuntu for Android works side-by-side and interlaces with certain Android features to deliver a more practical desktop experience without losing the perks of a user’s beloved Android device.

At this point, Canonical is still calling out to developers, manufacturers and carries to help support Ubuntu’s integration with Android, so it’s hard to say when we’ll actually see this in the consumer market. Canonical is, however, planning to demo Ubuntu for Android at next week’s Mobile World Congress convention in Barcelona, so we’ll definitely learn more then.

For more information on Ubuntu for Android, go here. Feel free to let Canonical know any ideas that you may have, features are up for discussion.

Let us know your thoughts.

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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How To Automatically Logon To Windows 7

If security isn’t a big issue for you, configuring Windows 7 to logon to your user account automatically can save you some time when your computer is starting up.

Just follow the tutorial outlined below to make Windows 7 automatically logon to your user account. When these steps are complete, Windows 7 will stop prompting for a user name and password when your computer starts up!

Difficulty: Easy
Time Required: Configuring Windows 7 to auto login to a user account takes less than 5 minutes

Here’s How:

  1. Click on Start and then enter the following command in the search box:
    netplwiz

    Press the ENTER key.

    This command will load the Advanced User Accounts Control Panel applet.

  2. In the Users tab, uncheck the box next to Users must enter a user name and password to use this computer.
  3. Click on the Apply button at the bottom of the User Accounts window.
  4. When the Automatically Log On dialog box appears, enter the user name you wish to automatically login to Windows 7 with. Then enter your account password in the two fields where it’s asked.Click the OK button.
  5. Click OK on the User Accounts window to complete the process.From now on, when your PC starts up, Windows 7 will log on automatically.
 
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Posted by on February 20, 2012 in Tips

 

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How do I enable Automatic Logon in Windows 7 when I’m on a domain?

Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK. In Windows Vista/7, simply typeregedit in Start Search and hit Enter.

Navigate to the following registry key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon

Double-click the DefaultUserName entry, type the user name to log on with, and then click OK.

If DefaultUserName registry value name is not found, create a new String Value (REG_SZ)with value name as DefaultUserName.

Double-click the DefaultPassword entry, type the password for the user account under the value data box, and then click OK.

If there is no DefaultPassword value, create a new String Value (REG_SZ) withDefaultPassword as the value name.

Note that if no DefaultPassword string is specified, Windows automatically changes the value of the AutoAdminLogon registry key from 1 (true) to 0 (false) to turn off theAutoAdminLogon feature.

In Windows Vista/7, DefaultDomainName has to be specified as well, else Windows will prompt for invalid user name with the user name displayed as .\username. To do so, double click onDefaultDomainName, and specify the domain name of the user account. If it’s local user, specify local host name.

If the DefaultDomainName does not exist, create a new String Value (REG_SZ) registry key with value name as DefaultDomainName.

Double-click the AutoAdminLogon entry, type 1 in the Value Data box, and then click OK.

If there is no AutoAdminLogon entry, create a new String Value (REG_SZ) withAutoAdminLogon as the value name.

If it exists, delete the AutoLogonCount key.

Quit Registry Editor.

Click Start, click Restart, and then click OK.

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2012 in Tips

 

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