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Category Archives: Tech-News

Download Internet Explorer 10 Offline Complete Installer for Windows 7

The latest version of Microsoft’s Web Browser Internet Explorer 10 is now available to download for Windows 7 users. Earlier when they launched it is only available for Windows 8 systems. Internet Explorer 10 is well optimized and designed for using touch screen devices and tablet devices.

IE10

IE 10 is not compatible with XP and Vista, its only available for Windows 7 and 8. In this version they bring a fast and fluid experience while browsing. The noticeable change in IE 10 is they have reduced buttons and options, moreover   clean look makes viewing websites enjoyable and convenient.

The most useful and amazing feature I found while using IE 10 is – when reading an article on a news site, we can just swipe across the screen to continue reading the next page instead of having to scroll down to click on a link.

 

Now lets discuss new features of IE 10

  •  High speed web browser. Web pages are loaded almost immediately.
  •  New address bar and One Box searching.
  •  Optimized for use with touch devices.
  •  Controls only visible when necessary. Browse full screen.
  •  SmartScreen Technology which offers greater protection and privacy.
  •  Three different ways to organize your “Favorites”.
  •  ”Do Not Track” , On by default.

System Requirements for IE 10

Processor

  Computer with a 1 gigahertz (GHz) 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor.

Operating system

  •  Windows 7 32-bit with Service Pack 1 (SP1) or higher.
  •  Windows 7 64-bit with Service Pack 1 (SP1) or higher. 
  •  Windows Server 2008 R2 with Service Pack 1 (SP1) 64-bit. 

Memory & Hard Drive Space

  •  Windows 7 32-bit—512 MB & 70 MB disk space. 
  •  Windows 7 64-bit—512 MB  & 120 MB disk space. 
  •  Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit—512 MB  & 200 MB disk space. 

Offline installers for IE 10 on Windows 7

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2013 in Tech-News

 

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Google Officially Announced Nexus 7 – Challenge to iPad and Kindle

 

Google has finally revealed its own Android Tablet Nexus 7. There has been a lot of rumors regarding Google’s own tablet with the partnership of ASUS. The tablet will cost just $199.  As previously reported, the device was built by Asus and comes with a 7-inch 1,280 x 800 HD display. According to Google, it’s running the Tegra 3 processor, and has a front-facing camera for video chatting. Wi-Fi connectivity, as well as Bluetooth and near-field communication support are also included in the device.

Nexus 7

In making the announcement, Google made its claim for a piece of a hard-fought market where its entry will compete against Amazon.com’s Kindle Fire – which it approximates in size and price – as well as Apple’s iPad.

The Nexus 7 comes in the customer’s choice of an 8GB or 16GB model. The 8GB option retails for $199, while the 16GB version will go on sale at $249. The device will start shipping in two to three weeks. However, interested customers can start preordering the tablet today.

Rounding out the specs is a Micro-USB port, 1GB of RAM, a 1.2-megapixel front camera (no back camera included), a gyroscope, GPS, accelerometer, microphone, and 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi.

The device measures 10.45mm thick, weighs 0.7 pound, and, from the looks of the first pictures released, has a textured, grippy backside and looks to be about the same size as the Kindle Fire.

The Nexus 7 will be the first device to run the latest version of the Android 4.1 OS, also known as Jelly Bean. Google says to expect 9 hours of 720p HD video battery life.

Source

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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Ex-Googlers Launch MightyText, An iMessage For Android Users

During their lengthy careers at Google in both senior technical and product management roles, Maneesh Arora and Amit Sangani were able to geek out on products like AdSense, AdWords, and the now-defunct Google Health. Arora tells us that, while his time at Google was defined by smart people and ambitious ideas like these, in development there was often a tendency to “over engineer” without thinking about “the average user.” He said that, while Google employees always had Gchat open and used Google Voice (or Wave while it was still alive), none of these products were able to effectively address the true value prop of communication tools for a mainstream audience: Syncing. Especially when it comes to texting.

Arora says simply, “To me, it makes no sense that I have to have my phone in front of me to communicate … If I leave it in another room, or in the car, or at home, I essentially have to retrieve it to see who’s calling or to receive incoming texts.” So, Arora and Sangani set out on a mission to give Android users the ability to view and reply to text messages no matter what device they happened to be using. After several months of beta testing, the pair are today officially launching MightyText — an app that aims to give Android users their own version of Apple’s iMessage.

After launching as Texty in March 2011, the startup rebranded as MightyText in June. Since then, it’s been more or less in beta and available solely as a Chrome extension. However, the Chrome extension has found some very solid early adoption, attracting over 250K users, who were sending more than 2 million messages every day. What’s more, Arora says that at the current run rate they are on target to hit one billion messages.

The co-founders used this early validation to raise $650K in seed funding last fall from a bunch of notable names, including First Round Capital, Charles River Ventures, 500 Startups, AngelList’s Naval Ravikant, Scott and Cyan Banister, ex-Google PM Director Rich Chen, Guitar Hero creator Kai Huang, Chegg founder Aayush Phumbra, and several others.

But, as a Chrome extension, MightyText had a fairly limited use case, so today, the co-founders are launching their new web app, which lets any Android user send and receive SMSes from virtually any device. While the co-founders have been describing their apps as “Gmail meets iMessage,” Arora thinks that MightyText has the potential to be more “open” and powerful than iMessage, which really only works between Apple users. Instead, MightyText lets Android users sent text to anyone they would normally text, whether they be on Android, iPhone, Blackberry, or even a feature phone.

So, in allowing users to SMS, MMS and make calls anytime, and from anywhere, it’s not hard to see the initial value prop for MightyText. But what’s important to note is that the app syncs with your existing Android number, which means you don’t have to get a new one — unlike Google Voice. (Huzzah!) And since MightyText lives in the cloud (and in your browser), it organizes all your texts, picture messages and calls, allowing you to search and store them securely for as long as needed. Much in the same way that Gmail (et al) organizes (using the term loosely), categorizes, and allows you to search through you email.

Because it hooks into your cell number and is essentially allowing you remote access to your phone from any device, the upside for MightyText is that it doesn’t have to take on any of the costs of SMS itself, which can be a big burden for SMS apps.

The other side of this, Arora says, is a benefit for the umpteen different carriers using Android. If users send text messages in third-party apps, by way of data or WiFi, carriers don’t get to make money on your SMSes, but, because MightyText keeps messaging confined to their network, these companies are likely going to be more inclined to partner with the startup down the road. (Especially if an API shows up down the road, hint, hint.)

The other thing to consider, Arora tells us, is that there are about 300 million Android devices in use today, which are collectively sending over seven trillion SMSes per year. While people are increasingly spending time on their computers and tablets at home and at work, they still can’t send or receive SMS on those devices.

But, with MightyText, users don’t have to change their behavior or get their friends to install the app to get value. They can just text from their phone as they normally would, with the added benefit of being able to push those messages to any computer, tablet, or phone — in the U.S. or international.

The other use case here that one might not pick out initially both shows the value of MightyText’s app and is just hilarious. Employers and teachers, to name a few, may not be excited to hear this, but Arora says that they’ve received scores of emails and messages from students and employees thanking them for finally building an app that allows them to text from their computer. Why? Well, generally speaking, it’s not a good idea to be found — while in class or in a meeting at the office — hovered over your phone, texting away like you don’t have a care in the world.

But, because MightyText allows you to use your own Android number to text from your laptop or iPad (and how many Android users do you know who also own an iPad?), your subterfuge is much more likely to go unnoticed. In fact, Arora even showed me a message to the team from a lawyer, who said that, thanks to MightyText, he was able to sit in court(!) and text plea negotiations back and forth with the prosecutor without taking out his phone or drawing the ire of the judge. Now that’s utility! (If it turns out that an unintended consequence of MightyText is the acceleration of the legal process, it’s going to be difficult to attach a price tag to MightyText that doesn’t involve the word “billions.” Not to mention that the startup will also be hearing from my lawyers. But in a good way.)

So, when Apple brings iMessage — and this same kind of functionality — to Macs this summer, Android users might otherwise have had to suffer silently as their friends gloated over cross-Apple-device messaging and gleefully asked Siri how to tie their shoes from their iPads. But, thankfully, MightyText gives Android users a come-back, which we all know they’ve been trying out in the TechCrunch comment section for months.

For more, find MightyText at home here.

 
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Posted by on June 20, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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Android ported to C#

Android ported to C#

Oracle and Google are currently in a $1 billion wrestling match over Google’s use of Java in Android.

But Java is not the only way to build native apps on Android. In fact, it’s not even the best way: we have been offering C# to Android developers as a high-performance, low-battery consuming alternative to Java. Our platform, Mono, is an open source implementation of the .NET framework that allows developers to write their code using C# while running on top of the Java-powered operating system, and then share that same code with iOS and Windows Phone.

Unlike Sun with Java, Microsoft submitted C# and the .NET VM for standardization to ECMA and saw those standards graduated all the way to ISO strong patent commitments. The .NET framework is also covered by Microsoft’s legally binding community promise.

Last July when Xamarin was getting started, we got our team together in Boston to plan the evolution of Mono on iOS and Android. After a day of kayaking in the Charles River, we sat down to dinner and turned our attention to how we could improve the performance and battery life of applications on Android, and make our own Mono for Android even better.

Over and over we came back to the basics: Dalvik is a young virtual machine, it is not as performant or tuned as Mono and suffers from many of Java’s performance limitations without the benefit of the high-end optimizations from Oracle’s HotSpot. One crazy idea that the team had at that dinner was to translate Android’s source code to C#. Android would benefit from C# performance features like structures, P/Invoke, real generics and our more mature runtime.

Although nothing happened back in July, this idea stuck in the back of our minds.

Fast forward a few months: Mono for Android is doing great, and we are starting to think again about improving our own product’s performance on Android. What if we could swap out Java with faster C# and get rid of various Dalvik limitations in the process? Could we create an Android phone completely free of Java, and free of the limitations of the Dalvik VM?

We decided it was crazy enough to try. So we started a small skunkworks project with the goal of doing a machine translation of Android from Java to C#. We called this project XobotOS.

Source and full article: Xamarin blog

 
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Posted by on May 2, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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Features removed in Windows 8

I made the usual list (and going to be hated by fanbois probably for it) 🙂 But my goal is to highlight those areas which are “damaged” or step back from Windows 7. Discuss and help make it more complete.

• Start Menu and its unique features like Start Menu jump lists, Frequently Used Programs etc have been removed (Not going to list individual Start menu features which Start screen doesn’t have)
• The ability to boot directly to the desktop and not load the Metro components in memory is not there
• The Lock screen is the place where you can now display custom background instead of the Logon screen, but unlike the Logon screen, there seems to be no way to programmatically change or cycle through a group of images for the Lock screen background. It must be set manually by the user from PC settings on the Start screen.
The “Unblock” button previously available on the file properties dialog for unblocking downloaded files (removing the NTFS Alternate Data Stream from the downloaded file) has been removed.
• Running Internet Explorer purely in 64-bit mode is not possible unless Enhanced Protected Mode is enabled which disables all addons. Otherwise, 64-bit IE10 opens 32-bit tabs.
Search option to use natural language search has been removed.
Mouse control panel option to allow or disallow themes to change mouse pointers is removed.
• File operations like Rename, Delete can no longer be undone from context menu for UAC-protected locations
• Security Essentials settings for configuring default actions or real-time protection have been removed. (Security Essentials is now built-in as Windows Defender)
• In a dual boot scenario, the ability to directly boot into another OS besides Windows 8 is slowed down because the new Windows 8 graphical boot shell/loader reboots to load the other operating system
• Windows Update settings for showing notifications and allowing all users to install updates have been removed. Windows Update no longer notifies with a balloon notification that there are new updates available. I will now have to manually check for updates once in a while by starting Windows Update or go to the Welcome screen to see if updates are available.
Sound events for ‘Exit Windows’, ‘Windows Logon’ and ‘Windows Logoff’ are removed
People Near Me P2P API is removed
• MSConfig’s Startup tab has been killed and replaced by the Task Manager’s Startup tab that doesn’t have the ‘Location’ column which was useful for example to know if the process started from HKCU or HKLM reg branch.
Previous Versions for Shadow Copies is removed. The half-baked replacement is the File History feature which is only for certain file types (documents, music, videos and pictures) in Libraries, desktop and browser favorites. Previous Versions worked for any generic file type in any folder.
Advanced Appearance settings which let you adjust colors, sizes and fonts are removed
• Explorer copy engine issue: Folder conflict prompt when merging/overwriting folders is removed. Explorer silently merges subfolders in a copy operation, you cannot choose entire subfolders to skip or overwrite
• Explorer status bar removes the ability to show important details. It is now a private undocumented control (DirectUI) so it also doesn’t allow Explorer addons like Classic Shell to show information like free disk space, total size of items without selection, computer zone, infotip information as it could on a standard status bar control.
• Explorer: Ability to enable both Details pane and Preview pane simultaneously or independently of each other in Explorer for display of file metadata as well as preview is gone
Flip 3D is gone
• Chkdsk when run at startup does not display any information about file system repairs besides % complete. This screen is gone when Chkdsk runs at startup and replaced by just a dumbed down % complete.
• Pen and Touch Input Desktop features no longer included because of Metro
Network Map feature and some network profile management UI from Network and Sharing Center is missing
Memory addresses and other technical information has been removed from the Windows 8 bug check screen (BSOD)
• Windows Boot logo is removed
• The new Task Manager is missing many features of the old one.
View Available Networks (VAN) UI has been degraded with access to the most important dialog: the Network’s Status removed. The VAN UI now covers the notification area icons unnecessarily and the Metro look is out of place on the Aero desktop
• The AutoPlay dialog removes the option to always open a particular program based on the file type
• The Open With dialog breaks the NoInternetOpenWith and NoFileAssociate Group Policies and browsing for a program with the redesigned Open With dialog requires three clicks instead of just one.
Windows CardSpace is not installed even after installing .NET 3.0/3.5
• The keyboard shortcut for Windows Mobility Center has been removed. Previously, Win+X brought it up, now it brings up the power user context menu.
• Desktop games (no word on whether they will be included or dropped in favor of Metro-style games):
• Chess Titans
• FreeCell
• Hearts
• Solitaire
• Spider Solitaire
• Minesweeper
• Mahjong Titans
• Purble Place
• Windows DVD Maker is removed
• Windows Briefcase
• Windows Gadget Platform is intact but no gadgets to download as the online Gadget Gallery was killed for Windows Vista and Windows 7 users as well.

Deprecated but not yet removed:
• Windows Backup and Restore is deprecated
• The command line tools, DiskPart.exe, DiskRAID.exe, and the Disk Management GUI are being deprecated and replaced by the WMIv2-based Windows Storage Management API with the Storage PowerShell command line utility. Dynamic Disks are being deprecated as part of this transition.
• Subsystem for UNIX-based applications is deprecated
• Some Transactional NTFS (TxF) APIs like savepoints, secondary RM, miniversion and roll forward

Aero dialogs made unproductive and ugly so you don’t feel like using them (Metro encroaching on the desktop):
User interfaces for View Available Networks (VAN) and AutoPlay
User interfaces for Open With, Windows Update restart prompt and Error Reporting
Reset and Refresh – a great new feature but what is this ugliness doing on the Aero desktop?

Source : http://xpwasmyidea.blogspot.com/2011/09/features-removed-in-windows-8.html

 
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Posted by on April 5, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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Preview Version Of Windows 8

This is the official preview version of Microsoft’s next operating system. Windows 8 is built on the Windows 7 core and introduces a new touch interface, optimized for portable devices. The drastically new look is mainly caused by the new navigation system which replaces the old Start Menu and uses large, colorful tiles and hideaway toolbars that appear when you hover your mouse in the left or right screen corner.If you exit the Metro interface, you will find a familiar Windows 7 desktop with icons, right-click menus and Windows Explorer. The common settings and configuration dialogs have been simplified and optimized for touch screen access and portable devices. The Control Panel, device manager and other advanced configuration options have mostly remained unchanged from Windows 7. (Check out our screenshots!)Windows 8 also includes an (App) Store with integrated video and game purchases and downloads, similar to the XBox 360 Guide. Another big change is that you can choose to run Windows 8 under a local account or a Microsoft account, which is required for many of the new media features (music, video, calendar, mail etc.) and integrates your Windows user account with many Microsoft services. (Not so sure about this one.)The download comes as an ISO disk image that needs to be burned to a DVD. Keep in mind that this is just a preview version and will expire at some point, do not replace you current operating system with this. We recommend installing it on a spare computer or virtual machine.The product key for this Consumer Preview is: DNJXJ-7XBW8-2378T-X22TX-BKG7J (required during installation).

Download:
Download the 32-bit version of Microsoft Windows 8 Consumer Preview
Download the 64-bit version of Microsoft Windows 8 Consumer Preview

 

 
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Posted by on March 1, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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Android falls flat in front of malware coming from Facebook

Google’s Android operating system has had its fair share of concerns as of late, with people growing concerned over flaws that have been unearthed at different times, and malware for the OS appearing on the Android Market. While the scale is still small enough to avoid, more crafty people are looking into ways to get their questionable apps on the OS so that they can cause havoc and potentially harvest details.

Google have tried to prevent this happening in the form of ‘Bouncer’, an automated scanner of the Android Market which picks up on malware and removes it. Bouncer came into use early in February, but it does not protect individual phones, nor does it prevent other sites from holding malware infested files. TechCrunch confirms that Sophos anti-virus have picked up on the flaw. The newest example is an application entitled “any_name.apk”; and it’s spreading via the Facebook for Android application.

When downloaded, the application installs without any permissions granted by the user, and the identity of what is being downloaded is also not made clear. This may not be the case assuming a phone maintains its default settings, since Android comes with a toggle against downloads from alternative sources. Many users do disable this though, so that they can download applications from locations such as the XDA Developers forum.

It seems that this APK is intended to call premium rate phone numbers or send them text messages, incurring large charges which can then be picked up by the fraudsters and con-men who operate the numbers, as well as likely having created the app. The app is also evolving quickly: the researcher who found it downloaded it from a different site a few days later, where it was called “allnew.apk”. The newer version worked in the same manner though was coded differently, which would imply that it is being constantly updated.

The malware associates itself with the Opera web browser for Android, including an encrypted configuration file with the dialling numbers for premium rate lines. Google have responded to the news, claiming that an install could not have happened in the manner depicted. According to Google a user would have to permit that the phone installed the application even if it was downloaded without their consent or knowledge. Sophos have not yet commented on this claim. Regardless, it may be worth unchecking the ability to download from other sources when not downloading an app, to help better maintain security.

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2012 in Tech-News

 

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